Keeping it local… Made in Tod

Keeping it local, I managed to make the most of a brief window in the weather and shoot a couple of panoramas on my doorstep in Todmorden this weekend.

Panoramic view of Todmorden outdoor market

(Click/tap the image above to view a panoramic 360° view of the scene in your browser)

Firstly, the outdoor market under some welcome blue skies. We’re lucky to still have an active indoor and outdoor market, unlike many similar-sized towns nearby. Although it faces increased competition from faceless supermarkets encroaching on the area, Tod market provides a great selection of goods & foodstuffs for local consumers. Campaigns such as Incredible Edible Todmorden have proudly promoted locally produced and sourced products, tying this in with greater awareness and action about the welfare and sustainability of foodstuffs.

The panorama below shows four traders, all of whom sell superb fresh local and regional produce. In the marquee you can see local free range pork farmers Porcus serving up one of their amazing rare breed hog roasts, and as you pan around you’ll see Paul the fishmonger (bringing fish direct from Fleetwood), Christine from CN Produce (who sells Porcus bacon and sausages amongst other regional delights) and Hazelwood’s greengrocers. Definitely the best place to shop in the town… totally local, and great value!

Incidentally, here’s a timelapse video I shot of a previous Porcus hog roast in Rawtenstall last year…

Secondly, inside Todmorden’s glorious Victorian Town Hall (which I originally shot back in 2008), was the annual Made in Tod show, organised by Todmorden Business Association to showcase local companies and producers. The event was well attended, and I decided to take capture this panorama from high above the exhibitors, using an aerial pole rig. I particularly like the ‘mirrorball’ view below, which provides a unique perspective on the event…

Panoramic view of the Made in Tod show 2012, inside Todmorden Town Hall

(Click/tap the image above to view a panoramic 360° view of the scene in your browser)

 

Mirrorball panoramic view of the Made in Tod 2012 show

 

 

John Rylands Library, Manchester

Enjoyed the chance to have a nosey around the John Rylands Library in Manchester earlier today, as part of a brief guided tour for photographers.

It’s a stunning building; with so many views and details the hour flew by. I had a great time, saw lots of things I’d like to have spent more time shooting, and would urge anyone to check out this architectural gem in the city centre.

The majority of these shots are HDR, shot with a variety of exposures; some 3x AEB and others up to 9x with a Promote controller, then processed in Photomatix and Lightroom.

Yet more cooling tower views

I couldn’t resist the chance to revisit the iconic cooling towers for a third time in early May, this time with another friend who’s also a photographer. I spent a lot of time onsite capturing HDRs and backplates for a separate sIBL project I’m working on, but I also managed to shoot a couple of panoramas inside the towers themselves.

The greatest challenge on the day was the wind: with the landscape so flat, and the towers themselves acting as giant chimneys, it was often hard to keep the tripod steady for long enough to shoot the exposure ranges. Meanwhile the clouds scudded across the sky, occluding the sun right in the midle of my exposures, creating massive changes in light levels. And finally it was distinctly chilly after the warmth of April. Lots of fun. Never the less, I was more than happy to spend the afternoon capturing some of the details and nuances of this site. There were a lot of changes from time I’d visited in January, and I’ve heard the site may be cleared soon. Glad we got another chance to explore while we could.

HTML5 version

Click the icons above to view a fullscreen 360° view of the scene with Flash (for desktop) or HTML5 (for mobile). You can also view the location in Google Earth. Happy viewing!

HTML5 version

Click the icons above to view a fullscreen 360° view of the scene with Flash (for desktop) or HTML5 (for mobile). You can also view the location in Google Earth. Happy viewing!

More views of the cooling towers

I went back to the site of the wonderful Thorpe Marsh Power Station near Doncaster this weekend with my friend English Electric: he to sample the colossal reverb inside the cooling towers, and I to take more photos. I’d only had a cursory visit in October, which barely whet my appetite, so I’ve being eager to go back ever since.

I got a lot of great stills, and also snapped a couple of panos. All are multiple exposure shots, but I’ve gone back to using Enfuse for these, rather than a ‘true’ HDR workflow, as I feel it works better for the subject matter.

Anyway, enough of the technical stuff. If you can visit this site, do so. It’s a photographer’s dream…

Click below for a full screen 360° view of the scene with Flash, to read more on Wikipedia, to see the location in Google Earth, or to view an iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch compatible version.

Click below for a full screen 360° view of the scene with Flash, to read more on Wikipedia, to see the location in Google Earth, or to view an iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch compatible version.

Whitby Abbey: vampires optional…

This is the impressive ruined Benedictine abbey which sits on the hilltop above Whitby, the delightfully picturesque fishing town on the coast of the North Yorkshire moors. The abbey forms an impressively moody sight in its own right, overlooking the North Sea and the quaint fishing harbour below.

However it (and the town below) found literary fame after Bram Stoker set part of his novel ‘Dracula’ in Whitby. The fictional count preyed on Lucy on the East Cliff, just a few yards from this abbey. 120 years after Bram Stoker wrote his gothic masterpiece, Whitby has become a regular place of gathering for goths from across the country. We arrived there on one such weekend, the day after Halloween, and the site was dotted with impressively-dressed goths checking out the ruins. The spectral figures added to the sense of other-worldliness. The skies were exactly what one would hope for in a setting like this: turbulent and rolling clouds, with shafts of sunlight breaking out above the autumnal moorland. Very evocative…

Click below for a full screen 360° view of the scene with Flash, to read more on Wikipedia, to see the location in Google Earth, or to view an iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch compatible version.