Crossing Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge on the ‘Causeway Coast’, Co. Antrim

A panorama taken from the middle of the famous rope bridge at Carrick-a-Rede, on County Antrim’s gloriously unspoiled north coast.

The rope bridge here is one of a series of well-loved tourist attractions along the “Causeway Coast”, situated as it is just a few miles east of the world famous Giant’s Causeway. Combining stunning views with a certain frisson of excitement and risk, it’s highly popular. Many thousands of visitors to the National Trust-managed site traverse the rope bridge every year, high above the crashing waves and swirling currents which separate the rocky islet from the cliffs of the coast.

A rope bridge has been present on the site for hundreds of years: it was originally set in place to allow seasonal access for salmon fishermen. The island, a small volcanic plug, sits next to a fishing ground which was a major source of employment. You can still see the small, recently-restored fisherman’s cottage on the island.

Growing up in Northern Ireland, this was one of the key destinations to bring visitors I first crossed the bridge in 1990 as a gangly, fearless teenager, when it felt considerably less solid than it does now. At that time it was a seasonal attraction: however this iteration of the bridge, installed in 2008, is open all year round (weather permitting, of course).

I hadn’t intended to shoot a pano of the bridge until we pulled up at the nearby carpark; however with such wonderful weather and smaller crowds – as we were visiting midweek and out of high season – meant I brought my pole & pano head along after all. I don’t have a great head for heights so I waited my turn to cross, quickly stopping in the middle and shooting the photos needed for this while looking resolutely straight ahead and trying not to get distracted. I only got to admire the view of the chasm below once I was safely back on terra firma, stitching this together from the comfort of my home!

Since capturing this view I’ve found various panoramas shot around the bridge, including on 360 Cities, but think this may be the first shot on (or indeed a couple of metres above) the bridge itself. Hope you enjoy the view!

A bird’s eye view from above a pleasure boat in Salford Quays

A bird’s eye view from above the Princess Katherine in North Bay, between MediaCityUK and The Lowry at Salford Quays. I’ve wanted to shoot a panorama from here for a couple of years, as I’ve captured panos from many of the tall buildings nearby and wondered what it would look like from the water, surrounded by the iconic buildings all around.

Amongst other sights, this view takes in the new BBC buildings, the MediaCity studios, the University of Salford’s MCUK, ITV’s offices (and across the Manchester Ship Canal, the new Coronation Street set), The Lowry and the Imperial War Museum in the North. Just beyond lies Trafford Park, and just out of sight, Manchester United’s famous football stadium at Old Trafford.

This was a bit of a challenge to photograph – a side wind meant the boat was drifting and rotating considerably even in the time it took to shoot this – but I still think it provides a cool perspective on one of the most dynamic parts of Salford and Manchester.

Flash flooding in Todmorden, West Yorkshire

Click/tap the image above to view a panoramic 360° view of the scene in your browser. 

Flash flooding hit parts of Todmorden on the afternoon of Monday 29th July 2013, and affected the areas of Gauxholme and Shade, as well as further upstream in the village of Walsden and elsewhere.

The worst part near us was Rochdale Road being flooded by an overflowing Walsden Water, between Shade and Gauxholme in Todmorden. The force of the rapidly rising water pushed against the sides of the bridge, collapsing the walls and pushing out through the retaining walls. The resulting water and masonry quickly filled Rochdale Road. This then poured down the road, flooding adjacent properties. A video of this can be seen below. The aftermath of the severely damaged bridge can be seen in the 360° panoramic photo at the top of this page.

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Massive Attack v Adam Curtis at MIF13, Mayfield Depot, Manchester

Look around the panorama above to explore a series of panoramic 360° views around Mayfield Depot. Toggle between a view showing the show layout, and the depot as it was before rigging, by click the button on the top right. Click/tap the red hotspots to jump from viewpoint to viewpoint.

Massive Attack v Adam Curtis, the much-anticipated event from Robert Del Naja, Adam Curtis and UVA opened last week as one of the headline attractions at this year’s Manchester International Festival. I was there in Mayfield Depot on the day before the show opened, just as the crew were testing video and audio. I have to admit, I had high expectations when this gig was announced: I’ve admired Adam Curtis’ documentaries for the last decade or more, and I last saw Massive Attack play in Manchester in 1998, when guests Horace Andy & Elizabeth Fraser (appearing here at MIF) provided outstanding performances. Expectations were raised further after spending an afternoon shooting the venue before it was cleaned and rigged out, trying to second-guess how it’d be used for the event.

Shooting this was… challenging and complicated. Capturing a 360° panorama requires shooting a series of images, in this case looking around every 90°. And shooting another series of different exposures to capture the wide dynamic range of light. Try doing that in a dark room where the video screens are constantly playing a huge range of different coloured, contrasting content; cycling rapidly and changing the light levels and reflections.

360° panorama of Massive Attack v Adam Curtis at MIF13

When I originally shot the venue back in May there was less light, but I had the luxury of several hours to capture the series of HDR panoramas at my own pace, largely undisturbed. Not this time… I had a brief window before full rehearsals commenced. All while crew members are frantically criss-crossing the floor, and visitors in high-viz vests are milling about. Definitely a shoot to keep me on my toes.

So a combination of patience, luck, determination, and a well-honed post-production routine resulted in the final image, which manages to capture the structure and feel of the newly-repurposed Mayfield Depot, but also gives a flavour of the intensity of the visual content (see the trailer below). It’s an incredible venue and a hell of an AV setup, and this should give an indication of standing the centre of such an immersive space.

360° panorama of Massive Attack v Adam Curtis at MIF13

Disclaimer: When I wrote this I’d not yet seen the full show… just some of the footage during the AV tests, and hearing a little of Liz Fraser singing a cappella on stage (which was pretty special). I saw it the following evening: it was overwhelming, disconcerting, thought-provoking and challenging… exactly what I’d expect from Adam Curtis, Massive Attack and UVA!

Panoramic camera rig in Mayfield Depot

Inside Hulme Hippodrome, Manchester

As part of RIBA’s Love Architecture Festival, the Manchester Society of Architects organised an open day, arranging access to a diverse range of spaces and places normally not open to the public. Due to prior engagements that day I had to (begrudgingly) choose just a single location for a whistle-stop visit. Top of my list was the Grade II listed Hulme Hippodrome, somewhere I’d been curious about since living nearby in the late 90s. As with Mayfield Depot and Victoria Baths, I’m drawn to neglected places in the city with rich cultural and historical depths, and had previously seen photos of the delights within.

360° panorama of Hulme Hippodrome interior by Joby Catto of Anti Limited

The nondescript facade of the building gives little clue of what’s inside, but the interior itself is stunning: riotously bright colours, ornate plaster mouldings and grandiose details abound. The richness and detailing in the auditorium is tempered by years of weather damage and dereliction. Neither time nor the elements have been been kind to the building; dilapidation has taken a toll on the furniture and fittings; the roof’s badly damaged, exposing the interior to Manchester’s delightful climate; and multiple pigeons have occupied most parts of the building, leaving fecal streaks everywhere.

360° panorama of Hulme Hippodrome interior by Joby Catto of Anti Limited

Luckily the Hippodrome has many admirers and supporters who recognise both the historical importance of the building, and the potential it has as a community resource. One man in particular is leading the drive to restore the former music hall and theatre to its former glory.

I chatted to Tony Wright, the operations manager for social enterprise The Youth Village, who’s worked tirelessly to raise funds and awareness since they occupied the building in 2011. His passion for the project is infectious. It needs to be; he estimates a full refurbishment will cost a cool £20 million, with initial work to fix the roof and guttering around £50,000. It’s an incredible space though… and through hard work, smart investment and strategic partnerships, that might be achievable. Spread the word about the anonymous building with the incredible secret hidden inside, and how you might be able to help…

Look around the image above to explore the Hippodrome in two different panoramic 360° views. Click/tap the white hotspot marker to jump from viewpoint to viewpoint.